Feb
24

Men at Work: Building Safe Communities Curriculum (Virtual Training)

Men At Work: Building Safe Communities is an innovative and multidisciplinary curriculum that:explores male violence against women in an accessible manner; challenges men to take responsibility for their actions; and provides the educational experience necessary to become allies in ending violence against women. In this three-day training, we will provide participants with the knowledge and tools needed to implement Men At Work. ▪ Men At Work Curriculum Implementation Training ▪ Men At Work Facilitation Training ▪ Men At Work Students' Manual ▪ Men At Work Instructors' Manual ▪ GCFV approved 20 FVIP hours The training will be held virtually through Zoom and will run from February 24th - 26th, 2021. The hours of the training will be 9:00am – 5:00pm each day. All times are eastern standard time. Please plan to attend the entire training. Included with the training: WHEN/WHERE TRAINING COST: $495 includes 3-day training, both manuals. 

CONTACT : LEE GIORDANO, DIRECTOR OF TRAINING E-mail: lee@menstoppingviolence.org Phone: 404.270.9894, ext. 20

Download this pdf file./document/publication/men-work-training/download

Feb
25

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: February 25, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Mar
5

GCFV Quarterly Commission Meeting

The Georgia Commission on Family Violence will hold its Quarterly Commission Meeting virtually via Zoom, Friday, March 5, 2020 at 10:00AM - 12:00PM. To attend the meeting please complete the meeting request form by March 1, 2021. The Zoom access link and meeting code will be sent within 24 hours of the meeting.

This meeting will count as one Community Education and Victim Advocacy hour for FVIP Providers and Facilitators.

If you have any questions, please call 404-657-3412.

Mar
10

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: March 10, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Mar
16

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: March 16, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file.Training Brochure

Mar
19

Working with Men across Difference: Tools for Addressing Bias and Inequality in Family Violence Intervention Programs

In any given class, differences across race, class, sexual orientation, religion, and age create meaningful group dynamics that impact participant experience. Appropriately addressing these dynamics can build group cohesion and deepen the overall experience. Avoidance of these group dynamics may instead undermine the objectives of your program. In this one-day training, Men Stopping Violence will introduce a framework for understanding inequality’s impact on Family Violence Intervention Programs and introduce program elements and facilitation skills necessary to properly address these harmful group dynamics rooted in inequality. 

Mar
29

FVIP Basics Training Series (Virtual)

FVIP Basics is required for those seeking certification as an FVIP Facilitator. This is not required for those who are already certified. Priority for this training will be given to those seeking certification. If space is available, certified facilitators may attend. Registration will close once capacity is reached.

This training fulfills the GCFV-Delivered 20 hour training. 

Apr
2

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: April 2, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file.Training Brochure

Apr
5

What is the difference between FVIP Facilitator Certification and FVIP Provider Certification?

There are two types of FVIP Certification. You can be a Certified FVIP Facilitator or a Certified FVIP Provider or you can be both. During this session, we will identify each certification and outline what is required for both.

Apr
9

Developing a comprehensive self paced stages model for BIP: a phase model and an integrated model

This workshop will review the latest stages model of batterer intervention program as either an integrated model or a module program. We will review the major components of this model and a lead a detailed discussion on the strategy of this model. We will point out the gaps in models which do not include this type of program development. Finally we will assist programs in developing methods of intervention that work in coordination with a stages model of intervention.

Objectives

Workshop participants will understand the key components in developing a  self paced stage model for BIP

Workshop participants will learn the benefits and limitations of phase and integrated models

Workshop participants will learn how to develop criteria for stage development and strategies for facilitating both types of group

Workshop participants will learn options for documentation of participants progress

Apr
10

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: April 10, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Apr
12

What is the difference between FVIP Facilitator Certification and FVIP Provider Certification?

There are two types of FVIP Certification. You can be a Certified FVIP Facilitator or a Certified FVIP Provider or you can be both. During this session, we will identify each certification and outline what is required for both.

Apr
19

What is the difference between FVIP Facilitator Certification and FVIP Provider Certification?

There are two types of FVIP Certification. You can be a Certified FVIP Facilitator or a Certified FVIP Provider or you can be both. During this session, we will identify each certification and outline what is required for both.

Apr
23

Woman Abuse: Intoxication Didn't Cause It and Sobriety Won't Cure It

Substance abuse and woman abuse are closely associated in the public's mind, so much so that many people believe the use of substances is a direct cause of woman abuse. It is imperative to understand that substance use/abuse did not cause the domestic violence therefore substance abuse treatment can not solve the domestic violence. At the same time we must understand how best to intervene with the abuser who has this dual problem of abusing women and alcohol and/or other drugs.

May
3

Practicing Self-Care for FVIP Facilitators and Providers

Domestic Violence is not an easy field to work in, and those who work with perpetrators of domestic violence have the difficult task of holding them accountable as well as trying to bring about change. This work can effect FVIP facilitators and providers emotionally and physically. What are you doing for your self-care? What struggles do you have, and in what areas do you need assistance.  Please join us as we discuss self-care. 

May
5

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: May 5, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file.Training Brochure

May
10

Practicing Self-Care for FVIP Facilitators and Providers

Domestic Violence is not an easy field to work in, and those who work with perpetrators of domestic violence have the difficult task of holding them accountable as well as trying to bring about change. This work can effect FVIP facilitators and providers emotionally and physically. What are you doing for your self-care? What struggles do you have, and in what areas do you need assistance.  Please join us as we discuss self-care. 

May
14

Totally Tools: From the Beginner in BIP Work to the Most Experienced

Drawing on years of experience in training staff, curriculum development and program development the faculty will share and discuss specific strategies and tools designed to augment and enhance the work you are doing with perpetrators of interpersonal violence.

Objectives

Workshop participants will learn new tools and strategies for utilization in a BIP

Workshop participants will learn about strategies which lead to successful  program design and subsequent tool design.

Workshop participants will develop a more critical analysis for the utilization of current tools in a BIP.

Critical thinking in the design and development of tools for BIPs

May
17

Practicing Self-Care for FVIP Facilitators and Providers

Domestic Violence is not an easy field to work in, and those who work with perpetrators of domestic violence have the difficult task of holding them accountable as well as trying to bring about change. This work can effect FVIP facilitators and providers emotionally and physically. What are you doing for your self-care? What struggles do you have, and in what areas do you need assistance.  Please join us as we discuss self-care. 

May
18

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: May 18, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Jun
4

GCFV Quarterly Commission Meeting

The Georgia Commission on Family Violence will hold its Quarterly Commission Meeting virtually via Zoom, Friday, June 4, 2020 at 10:00AM - 12:00PM. A meeting request form will be published here for the public to receive login information for the meeting. The Zoom access link and meeting code will be sent within 24 hours of the meeting.

This meeting will count as 1 Community Education and Victim Advocacy hour for FVIP Providers and Facilitators.

If you have any questions, please call 404-657-3412.

Jun
22

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: June 22, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file.Training Brochure

Jun
29

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: June 29, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Jul
25

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: July 25, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file.To register 

 

Aug
5

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: August 5, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file.Training Brochure