May
14

Totally Tools: From the Beginner in BIP Work to the Most Experienced

Drawing on years of experience in training staff, curriculum development and program development the faculty will share and discuss specific strategies and tools designed to augment and enhance the work you are doing with perpetrators of interpersonal violence.

Objectives

Workshop participants will learn new tools and strategies for utilization in a BIP

Workshop participants will learn about strategies which lead to successful  program design and subsequent tool design.

Workshop participants will develop a more critical analysis for the utilization of current tools in a BIP.

Critical thinking in the design and development of tools for BIPs

May
17

Practicing Self-Care for FVIP Facilitators and Providers

Domestic Violence is not an easy field to work in, and those who work with perpetrators of domestic violence have the difficult task of holding them accountable as well as trying to bring about change. This work can effect FVIP facilitators and providers emotionally and physically. What are you doing for your self-care? What struggles do you have, and in what areas do you need assistance.  Please join us as we discuss self-care. 

May
18

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: May 18, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file. To register 

 

May
25

Focusing on Sexual Violence as a Tactic of Control: Teaching Sexual Respect through FVIPs

Focusing on Sexual Violence as a Tactic of Control: Teaching Sexual Respect through FVIPs

Sexual violence accompanies physical and psychological violence as tactics used by men referred to Family Violence Intervention Programs, but is often de-emphasized in comparison. A de-emphasis on sexual violence may be a result of facilitator discomfort discussing the issue or a lack of understanding about how sexual violence relates to other abusive tactics. In this day long workshop, Men Stopping Violence will share its definition of male sexual violence, explore tactics on the spectrum of sexual violence, and provide tools to teach sexual respect in Family Violence Intervention Programs.

Jun
4

GCFV Quarterly Commission Meeting

The Georgia Commission on Family Violence will hold its Quarterly Commission Meeting virtually via Zoom, Friday, June 4, 2020 at 10:00AM - 12:00PM. Please register by June 1, 2021.  A meeting request form will be published here for the public to receive login information for the meeting. The Zoom access link and meeting code will be sent within 24 hours of the meeting.

This meeting will count as 1 Community Education and Victim Advocacy hour for Facilitators-in-Training and 1 Task Force meeting for certified FVIP Providers and Facilitators.

If you have any questions, please call 404-657-3412.

Jun
8

The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma‐Informed Lens and Response

The goal of this training is to enhance the capacity of law enforcement when responding to and investigating violence against women crimes. 

Jun
15

Coordinated Community Response

The goal of this training is to enhance the capacity of law enforcement when responding to and investigating violence against women crimes. 

Jun
16

Men At Work: Building Safe Communities Curriculum Training

Virtual Training

Men At Work: Building Safe Communities is an innovative and multi-disciplinary curriculum that: explores male violence against women in an accessible manner; challenges men to take responsibility for their actions; and provides the educational experience necessary to become allies in ending violence against women. In this three-day training, we will provide participants with the knowledge and tools needed to implement Men At Work.   Download this pdf file. Click here for more details .
 

CEUS: This training has been approved by the Georgia Commission on Family Violence for 20 FVIP hours.

Training Cost: $495

Contact Lee Giordano at (404) 270-9894 for more information or to register.

 

Jun
22

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: June 22, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file. Training Brochure

Jun
23

FVIP Basics Training Series (Virtual)

FVIP Basics is required for those seeking certification as an FVIP Facilitator. This is not required for those who are already certified. Priority for this training will be given to those seeking certification. If space is available, certified facilitators may attend. Registration will close once capacity is reached.

This training fulfills the GCFV-Delivered 20 hour training. 

 

Jun
28

Duluth Curriculum Training: Creating A Process of Change for Men Who Batter

Virtual Training

Duluth Curriculum Training: Creating A Process of Change for Men Who Batter

June 28-30, 2021

DAIP curricula are grounded in the Duluth Model, a constantly evolving philosophy based in DAIP’s work to end men’s violence against women through coordinated community response. The philosophy and concepts that guide the material can be challenging for both new and experienced facilitators.

Training provides important opportunities for participants to understand the curriculum and the process of facilitation, to examine their motivation for doing batterer-intervention work, and to examine their beliefs about men who batter and women who are battered. It is perfect for anyone who is starting a batterer intervention program, who is new to men’s non-violence group facilitation, or who has been facilitating for a while and would like to refresh their insight and information.

DAIP strongly encourages anyone who is using early versions of the curriculum, or parts or adaptations of more-recent versions, to complete a training program. Learning about the curriculum in this context will productively challenge and change how facilitators perceive and practice their work.

The prerequisite to purchasing this curriculum is having completed the curriculum training within the last 10 years.

Training topics include:

Understanding theories that guide our Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter or Creando un Proceso de Cambio para Hombres que Maltratan

Facilitating structured, interactive classes

Establishing and maintaining dialogue while avoiding collusion

Using control logs, exercises (including role-plays), and video vignettes

Helping men identify and change beliefs that support violence

Learning how a Creando un Proceso de Cambio para Hombres que Maltratan or Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter program fits within a Duluth Model interagency coordinated community response

Jun
29

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: June 29, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file. To register 

 

Jul
25

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: July 25, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file. To register 

 

Aug
5

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: August 5, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file. Training Brochure

Sep
10

GCFV Quarterly Commission Meeting

The Georgia Commission on Family Violence will hold its Quarterly Commission Meeting virtually via Zoom, Friday, September 10, 2021 at 10:00AM - 12:00PM. A meeting request form will be published here for the public to receive login information for the meeting. Please register for the meeting by Monday, September 6, 2021. The Zoom access link and meeting code will be sent within 24 hours of the meeting.

 

This meeting will count as 1 Community Education and Victim Advocacy hour for FVIP Providers and Facilitators.

If you have any questions, please call 404-657-3412.

Oct
1

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: October 1, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file. Training Brochure

Oct
19

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: October 19, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file. To register 

 

Nov
3

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized

Batterers Are Not Born They Are Socialized (Virtual Training)

Batterers are not born, they are socialized into a culture of male dominance and patriarchy against women. This training will focus on the socialization of men by examining the social norms, culture and traditional images of manhood that has created an environment that supports, tolerates and often encourages men's violence against women. During the workshop providers will gain insight into the construct of sexism and develop skills to challenge privileges and entitlements given to men.

Learning Objectives:

1) Examine the intergenerational transmission of family violence.

2) Discuss the dark side of masculinity.

3) Explore the impact of socialization on males and family violence connection.

4) Describe traditional male beliefs and family violence.

5) Integrating sexual abuse into your domestic violence program.

6 Describe some strategies for integrating male socialization into family violence intervention facilitation. 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: November 3, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

To register call 404-523-6074 or 404-906-4720

Download this pdf file. Training Brochure

Nov
16

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships - Cloned

Psychological Abuse in Intimate Partner Relationships

Psychological abuse by an intimate partner can be as dangerous as sexual or physical abuse in terms of putting victims at risk for long-term physical and mental health problems.  In a study by the National Violence Against Women Survey, the respondents surveyed reported psychological abuse more often than either physical or sexual abuse. Psychological abuse accounted for more than half the abuse reported by women and more than 75% of the abuse reported by men.

When researchers analyzed the link between health and abuse by an intimate partner, they found significant mental and physical health consequences of victims of physical and psychological abuse. Male and female victims of either form of abuse were more likely than people who didn't suffer abuse to develop chronic physical or mental illness. Also, they were more prone to poor general health, depression injury, and alcohol and drug abuse.

This workshop is designed to assist those who work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence to understand its effects and develop effective counseling approaches in assisting perpetrators in learning how to stop or reduce psychological abuse. 

Learning Objectives:

1) Define psychological abuse.

2) Explore playing Emotional Jeopardy game.

3) Explain the Gaslighting Syndrome.

4) Describe coercive control.

5) Examine gender specific psychological aggression.

6) Review psychological abuse from a victim liaison perspective.

7) Explore the cyber emotional abuse.

8) Describe the psychological maltreatment of children.

9) Utilizing emotional intelligence strategies with perpetrators of psychological abuse. 

 

Registration fee: $70.00

Date: November 16, 2021

Time: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Approved for 6 FVIP Hours

Download this pdf file. To register 

 

Dec
3

GCFV Quarterly Commission Meeting

The Georgia Commission on Family Violence will hold its Quarterly Commission Meeting virtually via Zoom, Friday, December 3, 2021 at 10:00AM - 12:00PM. Please register for this meeting by November 29, 2021. A meeting request form will be published here for the public to receive login information for the meeting. The Zoom access link and meeting code will be sent within 24 hours of the meeting.

This meeting will count as 1 Community Education and Victim Advocacy hour for Facilitators-in-Training and 1 Task Force meeting for certified FVIP Providers and Facilitators. 

If you have any questions, please call 404-657-3412.