2017 Conference Workshops

2017 GCFV Annual Conference Workshops


Monday, September 11, 2017

Workshop Session A 10:45 am - 12:15 pm

1) The Grady Nia Project: Culturally Competent Empowerment Program for Abused and Suicidal African American Women 

Both intimate partner violence (IPV) and suicidal behavior are significant public health concerns for women. This presentation discusses the link between IPV and suicide attempts. Then, attention is paid to the description of the Grady Nia Project, an empowerment-based group intervention designed to reduce those risk factors and enhance those protective factors associated with suicidal behavior among women in abusive partnerships. Data supporting the efficacy and effectiveness of the Grady Nia Project will be shared. Finally, a case vignette will illustrate the lives and experiences of the women in the Grady Nia Project.

Nadine J. Kaslow, Ph.D., ABPP is a Professor with tenure, Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Chief Psychologist, Grady Health System; and Vice Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. In 2012, she received a Doctorate of Humane Letters from Pepperdine University. The 2014 President of the American Psychological Association (APA), Dr. Kaslow is Past President of APA’s Divisions of Clinical Psychology, Family Psychology, and Psychotherapy, as well as the American Board of Clinical Psychology and the American Board of Professional Psychology. She is the Former Chair and Board Member Emeritus of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC). She was the Editor of the Journal of Family Psychology from 2008-2014. Dr. Kaslow was a Primary Care Public Policy Fellow through the United States Public Health Service, a fellow of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program, and a Fellow of the Woodruff Leadership Academy. She has received numerous awards including APA’s Distinguished Contributions for Education and Training Award, an APA Presidential Citation for assisting displaced interns and postdoctoral fellows in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, APPIC’s Award for Excellence in Postdoctoral Training, a Heiser Award for her legislative advocacy efforts, the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award for inspiring her junior colleagues to develop effective programs in the community, the Grady Health Foundation’s Inspiring Mentor Award, and Emory University’s Thomas Jefferson Award. The recipient of multiple federal and foundation grants, she has published over 300 articles and three books. A member of Rosalynn Carter’s Mental Health Advisory Board, she is a nationally recognized expert in suicide, intimate partner violence and child maltreatment, depression in children and adolescents, post-traumatic stress disorder, and psychology education and training. Dr. Kaslow is the psychologist for the Atlanta Ballet and a frequent media guest.

Sarah E. Dunn, Ph.D., ABPP is a faculty member in the Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She is the Clinical Director for the Grady Nia Project, a culturally competent, empowerment-based program for abused and suicidal low-income African American women. She has extensive administrative, supervisory, and clinical experience with this population. She has also been active in the development and implementation of a Psychiatric Emergency Service based in the medical emergency department at Grady Health System. With considerable experience in psychological assessment, Dr. Dunn is a primary supervisor for psychological testing performed by practicum students, interns, and post-doctoral residents in Emory’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences based at Grady Health System. Dr. Dunn has local and national forensic experience particularly to criminal and civil cases related to intimate partner violence, childhood maltreatment, and death by suicide. Dr. Dunn has published on integrated health care, intimate partner violence and suicide, and the traumatic impact of extended captivity in a cult environment characterized by abuse and torture. She has given numerous newspaper, magazine, and radio interviews related to suicide and intimate partner violence.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Sexual Assault Advocates, Victim Advocates

2) Avoiding Collusion: Following Survivors’ Lead 

Imagine a world where those serving survivors are doing social change, not social work. Rather than being a "client needing help," the survivor becomes an equal partner in reading the world we all share. We may actually collude with abusers when we don't follow survivors' leads, listen to their stories and engage in meaningful dialogue. What does that process really look like? In this workshop, participants will learn what we mean by dialogue, how to be vigilant about collusion, and how to facilitate the mystery and power of survivors' stories.

Beth Beams holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Indiana University, with highest distinction, and is a licensed social worker, having received the following awards: Outstanding Domestic Violence Professional (ICADV), “Citizen of the Year” (Indiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers), “Great Men and Women” (Multicultural Services, IPFW) and “Hidden Heroines” (FW Women’s Bureau). Annually since 1996, she has conducted the national trainings “In Our Best Interest” and “Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter” on behalf of the National Training Project, Duluth, MN. She has been employed at the Center for Nonviolence in Ft. Wayne, Indiana as Coordinator of Women’s Programs since 1984. She has served in the past as Associate Faculty, IPFW, Women’s Studies Program, as Director of Education for Planned Parenthood of NE Indiana, as Women’s Advocate for the YWCA Women’s Shelter, and as Crisis Counselor for the Rape Crisis Center in Ft. Wayne. She has served on the Mayor’s Commission on Domestic Violence, and has offered keynote speeches and trainings to the Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Texas Council on Family Violence and the National District Attorneys Association Annual Conference on Domestic Violence. She serves on the DV Advisory Committee of the Indiana Supreme Court.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Sexual Assault Advocates, Victim Advocates, Attorneys

3) Women's Use of Violence In Intimate Partner Relationships 

This workshop will examine women’s use of violence in intimate partner relationships and provide an understanding of why women are increasingly being court-ordered to attend groups on domestic violence. In addition, this workshop will touch on successful ways communities can organize around and intervene to help women end the violence in their lives.  

Laura Connelly has worked to end domestic violence for the past fifteen years through volunteer work, direct client services, and systems-level advocacy. She provides consulting services and expertise to organizations based around the United States that are working on initiatives related to domestic violence. She has co-authored two nationally used curricula and regularly consults on design and implementation of group work with men and women who use violence in their intimate partner relationships. Laura holds a Master’s degree in Advocacy and Political Leadership from the University of Minnesota. She was named a 2015 Bush Fellow and is using the two-year fellowship to expand her leadership skills, network, and knowledge – all with the goal of helping to advance the status of women at the local, regional, and national levels. Laura lives in northern Minnesota with her husband and two children.

4) Federal Prosecutions of Domestic Violence Crimes 

Although the vast majority of domestic violence crimes are prosecuted in state court, an array of federal criminal laws are also available to prosecute perpetrators of domestic violence. This workshop will provide an overview of the federal laws applicable to domestic violence scenarios and a brief background of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). We will discuss federal firearms laws as they relate to domestic violence situations, including the federal prohibition on possession of a firearm by individuals with qualifying misdemeanor domestic violence convictions. The workshop will highlight several successful federal prosecutions involving domestic violence scenarios.

Jessica C. Morris is an Assistant United States Attorney (AUSA) in the Major Crimes section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta where she prosecutes violent crimes, firearms offenses, human trafficking, child exploitation, and immigration crimes. As an AUSA, she helps coordinate the office’s Violent Repeat Offender Program, which involves working with local law enforcement partners to identify and prosecute individuals who are already prohibited from possessing a firearm but who persist in committing violent offenses while armed. Jessica previously worked for the Department of Justice in Washington, DC, where she investigated and prosecuted cases with an international component as a trial attorney in the Human Rights and Special Prosecution Section. She also served as a Special Assistant United States Attorney in the Eastern District of Virginia. Before attending law school at the University of Georgia, she worked for a refugee resettlement organization in Nairobi, Kenya.

Intended Audience: Prosecutors, Attorneys, Legal Advocates, Judges, Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers)

5) Identifying and Supervising Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic violence cuts across all boundaries of race, age, social class and even sexual orientation, impacting the lives of individuals from all social categories—including those involved with the criminal justice system. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that the victim and probation/parole populations are not mutually exclusive populations. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, between 40 and 57 percent of women offenders in prison, jail or on probation supervision reported experiencing physical or sexual abuse prior to their sentence. Of those women, approximately half reported that their abusers were intimate partners. Increasingly, community corrections agencies and professionals are addressing intimate partner violence through enhanced—in some cases, specialized—supervision of intimate partner abusers. These efforts have been critical to enhancing the criminal justice response to domestic violence and have demonstrated the critical role that community corrections should play in addressing intimate partner violence. However, probation, parole, and pretrial services professionals can also play an important role in identifying and addressing the needs of victims of intimate partner violence under community supervision. In addition, due to the nature of the work that community corrections officers do and the access that they have to the homes and lives of the individuals they supervise, they are also in a unique situation to recognize potential unreported cases of IPV. This workshop will identify risk factors that may provide insight into whether an individual is experiencing IPV; list sample screening questions and assessment tools that supervision officers can use to screen for IPV; identify collateral contacts and other data that may be useful sources of information when seeking to identify IPV victims; and identify supervision strategies that officers can use to help protect the safety and address risk/needs of individuals on supervision who are victims of IPV.

Jim Henderson is a technical assistance provider for the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women through the Battered Women’s Justice Project. From 1991 to 2008, Jim was a probation officer responsible for overseeing the policies and practices of Intensive Probation for Stalking and Domestic Violence offenders in Ann Arbor, MI. He was assigned to the Washtenaw County Domestic Violence Unit as part of the Judicial Oversight Demonstration Initiative from 1999 to 2005 and works from a system perspective to enhance victim’s safety and defendant accountability. He has provided batterer intervention within the Detroit metropolitan area since 1995. Before joining the criminal justice system in 1991, he worked as the clinical director of Straight, Inc., a family oriented substance abuse program for drug using young people and their families. Jim has been a Certified Addiction Counselor II since 1987 and an Internationally Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor since 1990. He received his Master's degree in Social Work from the University of Michigan in 1995.

Intended Audience: Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers), Prosecutors, Judges, Attorneys


Monday, September 11, 2017

Workshop Session B  2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

1) Women's Use of Violence In Intimate Partner Relationships (Repeat from Session A) 

This workshop will examine women’s use of violence in intimate partner relationships and provide an understanding of why women are increasingly being court-ordered to attend groups on domestic violence. In addition, this workshop will touch on successful ways communities can organize around and intervene to help women end the violence in their lives.  

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, FVIP Providers, Victim Advocates

2) If advocates fail to resist "domestication," can they truly be agents of liberation? 

Just as a survivor finding their power can be unnerving to a family, an empowered advocate can be unnerving to their community. The common response of both family and community is to pressure you to "know your place." This is "domestication:" the twin sibling of oppression. This workshop will address how to resist this pressure, examine how domestication blunts advocacy, and provide strategies for overcoming our own domestication as advocates.

Beth Beams holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Indiana University, with highest distinction, and is a licensed social worker, having received the following awards: Outstanding Domestic Violence Professional (ICADV), “Citizen of the Year” (Indiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers), “Great Men and Women” (Multicultural Services, IPFW) and “Hidden Heroines” (FW Women’s Bureau). Annually since 1996, she has conducted the national trainings “In Our Best Interest” and “Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter” on behalf of the National Training Project, Duluth, MN. She has been employed at the Center for Nonviolence in Ft. Wayne, Indiana as Coordinator of Women’s Programs since 1984. She has served in the past as Associate Faculty, IPFW, Women’s Studies Program, as Director of Education for Planned Parenthood of NE Indiana, as Women’s Advocate for the YWCA Women’s Shelter, and as Crisis Counselor for the Rape Crisis Center in Ft. Wayne. She has served on the Mayor’s Commission on Domestic Violence, and has offered keynote speeches and trainings to the Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Texas Council on Family Violence and the National District Attorneys Association Annual Conference on Domestic Violence. She serves on the DV Advisory Committee of the Indiana Supreme Court.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Sexual Assault Advocates, Victim Advocates, Attorneys

3) Managing the Aftermath: A Survey of Resources and Support for Survivors of Murder-Suicide 

Once the case is closed, survivors still face a long-term struggle in the aftermath of a murder-suicide. The term "survivors" includes a wide range of individuals directly impacted by a murder-suicide event. Sometimes referred to as co-victims, this includes family members, friends, coworkers, and, at times, the surviving target of the intended homicide. While the trauma associated with murder-suicide bears some similarities to the experiences associated with the sudden, violent loss of a loved one in other contexts, the murder-suicide category carries unique complications facing survivors and therefore necessitates a more singularly focused approach. This workshop will explore a range of resources currently aimed at the specific challenges facing victims of murder-suicide. The discussion will include understanding the unique characteristics of this victim group, identifying the gap in resources available to these individuals, and exploring where resources and support services can be improved to meet the specific needs of those facing this tragic situation.

April W. Ross, Esq. is an Assistant District Attorney for the Fulton County District Attorney's Office. Ms. Ross earned her Juris Doctorate in 2011 from Atlanta's Emory University School of Law. She also graduated summa cum laude with her MBA and Bachelor of Science in Business degrees from Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, in 2005. As a law student at Emory, Ms. Ross received notable recognition for her advocacy skills. She was one of five students in her class to receive the esteemed Emory Law Kessler-Eidson trial advocacy award and scholarship. She participated in Emory Law's Mock Trial team, where her team was the regional winner and national finalist in her competition division. In her third year of law school, Ms. Ross was a coordinator for the Emory Barton Juvenile Law Clinic's Know Your Rights Program, a group dedicated to educating youth about their rights when encountering law enforcement and the criminal justice system. She also served as a volunteer victim advocate for the Partnership Against Domestic Violence in the Fulton County Safe Families Office, helping victims of domestic abuse obtain emergency protective orders and find safe alternatives while trying to escape intimate partner violence. After becoming a Fulton County Assistant DA during 2012, Ms. Ross was the youngest attorney to serve on the Atlanta Public Schools' cheating scandal trial team, to which she made significant contributions. In April 2014, Ms. Ross was shot multiple times by her husband after she filed for a divorce. She was shot in the face, arm and back, and was paralyzed from the chest down. Since the incident, Ms. Ross has been sharing her story and helping victims and survivors of abusive relationships rebuild their lives. In 2015, Ms. Ross returned to work at the Fulton County District Attorney's Office where she has joined the Domestic Violence Policy and Trial Unit. She is currently involved with a multi-organization task force working on legislation aimed at reducing the number of domestic violence fatalities involving firearms. She speaks to domestic violence survivors and organizations which serve them, to advocate for change against what she sees as the epidemic in our society of abuse and violence in intimate relationships. Ms. Ross also helps mentor people  with recent spinal cord injuries at the Shepherd Center, particularly those whose injury was the result of gun violence. In addition to her work and advocacy, Ms. Ross continues to pursue rigorous physical therapy and rehabilitation programs to improve her mobility and strength. In spite of her injury she remains steadfast in her belief that with God's grace she will one day walk again. She is a member of Cascade United Methodist Church.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

4) We See You, Supervising Stalking Offenders 

Stalking is a pattern of behavior directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. Often, violations of no contact orders, calls from jail, and other forms of harassment constitute violations of stalking laws, yet these violations are often not prosecuted to the full extent. Because stalking laws often have stiffer statutory penalties, practitioners should know how to document evidence of stalking and request that prosecutors issue new charges. Supervising agents and other system players should educate stalking victims to recognize and document stalking in a way that allows the system to be the primary presenter of evidence during a trial. Community partners who understand the nature and dynamics of stalking can enhance public safety and help save lives. This session will provide an overview of stalking and suggestions on how to supervise probationers and parolees who engage in stalking behavior.

Jim Henderson is a technical assistance provider for the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women through the Battered Women’s Justice Project. From 1991 to 2008, Jim was a probation officer responsible for overseeing the policies and practices of Intensive Probation for Stalking and Domestic Violence offenders in Ann Arbor, MI. He was assigned to the Washtenaw County Domestic Violence Unit as part of the Judicial Oversight Demonstration Initiative from 1999 to 2005 and works from a system perspective to enhance victim’s safety and defendant accountability. He has provided batterer intervention within the Detroit metropolitan area since 1995. Before joining the criminal justice system in 1991, he worked as the clinical director of Straight, Inc., a family oriented substance abuse program for drug using young people and their families. Jim has been a Certified Addiction Counselor II since 1987 and an Internationally Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor since 1990. He received his Master's degree in Social Work from the University of Michigan in 1995.

Intended Audience: Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers), Prosecutors, Judges, Attorneys

5) Working With Immigrant Survivors While Dealing with the Real World

This workshop will discuss strategies when working with immigrant survivors that address the challenges and realities immigrants experience in today's climate. Utilizing Caminar Latino’s 27 year history of working with immigrant Latino families impacted by violence, the impact of immigration and violence and effective methods in addressing these barriers will be examined. Using case examples as well as discussion, the training will address the following objectives: outline the psychosocial issues associated with being an immigrant, as well as those that are particular to undocumented immigrants, and additional factors to consider when immigrants are also experiencing gender-based violence;  describe dilemmas that may occur and discuss recommendations; and offer guidelines for best practice with immigrant individuals and families.

Jessica Nunan, LMSW, serves as the Executive Director of Caminar Latino, a nonprofit domestic violence program for Latino families. She has been involved with Caminar Latino for the past 23 years, of which she spent 11 as a volunteer in the youth program. Her main areas of expertise are violence prevention with youth, leadership development, research, community engagement, and program development. In 2015, Ms. Nunan was appointed by Governor Nathan Deal to the State Commission on Family Violence. In addition, Ms. Nunan currently serves as an advisory committee member for Sesame Street in Communities and is a member of the Casa de Esperanza National Policy Advisory Council as well as the Futures Without Violence National Advisory Committee. In 2016, she received an invitation to attend the “United State of Women” event that was convened by the White House. She obtained her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from Berry College in Georgia in 2001 and her Master's degree in Social Work from Georgia State University in 2003.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Sexual Assault Advocates, DFCS Personnel, FVIP Providers, Victim Advocates

 

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Workshop Session C 10:45 am - 12:15 pm

1) The Danger Assessment (DA) in Practice 

This breakout will give participants an overview of how to administer the Danger Assessment (DA), calculating the weighted scoring for the DA, the resulting levels of danger and what kinds of safety strategies might be recommended at each level. Participants will be eligible for certification in the DA at the completion of the session and will receive directions on how to obtain and use the certification.

Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell is the Anna D. Wolf Chair and a Professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the National Program Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program.  Her 14 major federally funded collaborative research investigations from the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control have included studies of domestic violence homicide and improving the criminal justice and health care response to intimate partner violence (IPV).  This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near lethal domestic violence and coordinated system (criminal justice, social services and health) responses to address IPV. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine (part of the National Academies of Sciences) in 2000, she was the Co-Chair of the NAM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence and is on the Board of Directors of Futures Without Violence and the One Love Foundation, has served on the boards of five Domestic Violence shelters and is currently a member of the Baltimore DV Fatality Review Committee.  Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles and seven books and has extensive policy related service including testimony at congressional meetings and before the Senate, as well as policy and research agenda setting meetings with NIH, CDC, SAMHSA, DHHS Office on Women’s Health, the Department of Justice (Office on Violence Against Women, NIJ), the World Bank, WHO, and the American Academy of Nursing.    

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

2) Teen Dating Violence: How the Breaking Silence Teen Textline Works as an Intervention for Youth Experiencing IPV 

The Breaking Silence Teen Textline was developed in 2012 by Project Safe Inc., an organization working to end domestic violence in Athens and surrounding counties in Georgia. Numerous research articles have addressed teen dating violence as a prevalent and serious issue in teenage relationships. Project Safe recognized that teenagers were not reaching out in traditional ways to receive help and thus created the Breaking Silence Initiative to raise awareness of both healthy and unhealthy aspects in dating relationships. The Breaking Silence Teen Textline is a text messaging based hotline aimed at teens to provide support, advice and access to resources for teens experiencing dating violence. In 2016, the Breaking Silence Teen Textline began expanding to serve the entire of State of Georgia. This workshop will share the trends in conversations that are received on the teen textline and discuss how this data can be used to shape youth focused programs. Information about how the teen textline operates and how to market it to teens will be given. We will explore the definition of teen dating violence and the distinctive features that set it apart from other forms of intimate partner violence, as well as the unique barriers to safety that teenagers face.   

Mary Haddon is the Youth Educator and Advocate at Project Safe, an organization working to end domestic violence in the Athens area and surrounding counties. As the Youth Educator and Advocate, Mary oversees youth focused outreach, education, and prevention programs, and works to spread information about the Breaking Silence Teen Textline. Mary is an active member of the Domestic Violence Task Force of Athens-Clarke and Oconee Counties and holds a leadership role on the Task Force’s Kids and Teens Subcommittee. Mary is one of the founding members of the Georgia Teen Advocates Network, a group of domestic violence advocates from across the state who work to implement and improve local Teen Dating Violence awareness and prevention programs. Mary earned her Master of Social Work degree from the University of Georgia with a certificate in Nonprofit Management and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Georgia College and State University.  

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

3) Introduction to the Safe and Together Model: Creating Domestic Violence-informed Child Welfare Systems

The Safe & Together™ Model is a field-tested framework designed to support domestic violence-informed practice at the intersection of domestic violence and children maltreatment. With a growing body of evidence demonstrating its effectiveness, the model is a child-centered approach, focused on interventions with perpetrators and partnerships with adult survivors. This workshop will introduce the model for domestic violence advocates working with child welfare involved families, child welfare workers and/or service providers. This workshop will also discuss how the model might improve community collaboration where domestic violence intersects with child welfare. Attendees will learn core knowledge and skills related to the model such as 1) the assumptions, principles and critical components of the model, 2) partnering with survivors toward child safety, 3) assessing risk in child welfare cases, 4) the importance of documentation with case examples, and 5) intervening with domestic violence perpetrators’ behaviors.

Kyle Pinto, MSW, is an Associate Director at the Safe & Together Institute (formerly David Mandel & Associates). He has provided training and consultation to child welfare systems, domestic violence advocates, fatherhood programs and family courts across the country and internationally. Kyle has worked throughout the child welfare, criminal justice and domestic violence fields for over ten years as a child welfare social worker in the District of Columbia and Providence, RI and as a community educator/counselor for the Women’s Center of Greater Danbury in Connecticut. He has also worked with men on parole and probation through the Alternative to Incarceration Center and has contributed to policy reform with the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance. Kyle was also the founder of the Men’s Initiative, an educational and community activist program highlighting the role men play in violence prevention, which he had the honor of presenting to the International White Ribbon Campaign.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Judges, DFCS Personnel

4) Georgia FVIP Rule Update 

This workshop will provide an overview of GCFV’s compliance monitoring site visit process and highlight a summary of deficiencies noted in site visits in 2017. Common issues with certification and recertification applications will also be covered. Suggested best practices in response to the most common deficiencies will be provided. Additionally, the workshop will include an overview of the proposed changes to the rules that govern FVIP providers and facilitators in the State of Georgia.

Jameelah Brown Ferrell is the Family Violence Intervention Certification Coordinator with the Georgia Commission on Family Violence (GCFV). Jameelah has been employed with GCFV for 10 years. Jameelah is responsible for certifying all Family Violence Intervention Programs (FVIPs) in Georgia. Jameelah also spearheads the coordination for GCFV’s annual conference. Jameelah received a Bachelor’s in Mass Communications from Florida International University in 2000 and a Master’s in Fine Arts from Full Sail University in 2015. Jameelah is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and she enjoys volunteering, caring for animals, writing screenplays and film production.

Meredith Stepp is the Family Violence Intervention Program Compliance Coordinator for the Georgia Commission on Family Violence (GCFV). Meredith recently returned to GCFV having worked for the Commission in 2003 through 2005 certifying Family Violence Intervention Programs (FVIPs) and conducting research on police procedure and response to family violence 911 calls. Prior to returning to GCFV, she worked as an instructor and professor for the University of Arkansas at Little Rock for seven years. Meredith earned her a B.A. from Agnes Scott College in 2000 and an M.S. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2008.

Mark Guzzi currently serves as in-house legal counsel for the Georgia Department of Community Supervision (DCS). Mark joined DCS in December of 2015 and is primarily responsible for the development of policies that guide DCS’s operations in a variety of areas including employment practices, field operations and public procurement. Mark is also responsible for ensuring that DCS’s procurement activities comply with the State Purchasing Act and reviewing adverse action appeals filed by employees that have received adverse disciplinary actions. Mark also assists the Georgia Commission on Family Violence in its monitoring of Family Violence Intervention Programs and provides legal advice and guidance to the Commission’s Executive Director on an as-needed basis. Mark began his legal career in 1992 when he joined the Chief Counsel’s Office with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections as an Assistant Counsel. In January of 2000 Mark joined the Georgia Department of Corrections’ Office of Legal Services as Supervising Counsel and was eventually promoted to Assistant General Counsel as well as General Counsel. Mark earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice in 1989 from Northeastern University located in Boston, MA and his Juris Doctorate Degree in 1992 from the Pennsylvania State University – Dickinson School of Law located in Carlisle, PA.

Intended Audience: FVIP Providers, Domestic Violence Advocates, Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers), Prosecutors, Judges

5) Sexual Assault Kits in Georgia: Past, Present and Future 

This workshop will take participants through the evolution of the handling of DNA evidence in sexual assault investigations, specifically the Georgia Bureau of Investigation's sexual assault kit (or “rape kit”). The workshop will examine the policies and practices that influenced a backlog of sexual assault kits throughout the state and examine the legislative and current state projects designed to rectify “the backlog” and prevent future backlogs. The presentation will also focus on victim-centered investigations, victim notification protocols and best practices.

Amy Hutsell is the Sexual Assault and Human Trafficking Unit Supervisor with Georgia’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. At CJCC, she oversees the state Sexual Assault Response Team Project, which provides technical assistance and best practices training to Georgia’s 49 judicial circuits. She Co-Chairs and leads the State SART Expert Committee, which provides guidance in the development of resources, such as sexual assault guidelines, model protocols and a SART website. She provides protocol development training and workshops for Sexual Assault Protocol committees throughout Georgia. She has over 10 years of experience in sexual assault and child sexual abuse services. Previously, she was the Assistant Director of the Gwinnett Sexual Assault Center and Children’s Advocacy Center, where supervised the agency’s team of advocates, forensic nurses, counselors, legal advocates and volunteers. She has served on the Children’s Advocacy Center of Georgia’s Membership and Standards Committee as a site reviewer. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Georgia State University.  

Ann Burdges is the CEO/Executive Director of the Gwinnett Sexual Assault Center & Children’s Advocacy Center. Ann has worked in law enforcement as a uniform patrol officer and investigator. She has provided professional training throughout Georgia and nationally for law enforcement, sexual assault nurse examiners, advocates and SART teams. Ann is a recipient of numerous awards and serves on the board of End Violence Against Women International. She has also served on the U.S. Attorney General’s Federal task Force on Drug Facilitated Sexual Assaults and as an Advisory Board Member of RAINN.
 

Intended Audience: Sexual Assault Advocates, Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers), Prosecutors, Judges, Victim Advocates


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Workshop Session D 1:45 pm - 3:15 pm

1) The Suicide-Homicide Connection: Findings from the GA Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project 

A key goal of the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project is to identify gaps in system response and points of intervention to reduce the number of domestic violence-related deaths in Georgia. This workshop will take a special look at the problem of domestic violence-related murder-suicide. Workshop attendees will be provided an overview of the trends identified in reviewed cases that ended in murder-suicide versus cases ending in homicide, with a focus on criminal and civil interventions as well as interventions by advocates, family members, friends, and the faith community. Presenters will also explore relationship dynamics and tactics of abuse which are unique to murder-suicide cases. Recommendations for incorporating suicide prevention strategies into your work will also be provided.

Niki Lemeshka is the Fatality Review Coordinator at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. In that capacity she oversees the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, conducts reviews of domestic violence-related fatalities and near fatalities with multi-disciplinary teams across the State of Georgia, co-authors the Project’s Annual Report and provides technical assistance to task forces as they implement Project recommendations. Previously, she filled the roles of Outreach Coordinator and Legal Advocate at Cherokee Family Violence Center (Canton, GA) and was employed in Child Protective Services. Niki previously served on the State of Georgia’s Protocol Development Committee for co-occurring cases of domestic violence and child maltreatment, is the former Chair of both the Cherokee County Domestic Violence Task Force and the Blue Ridge Judicial Circuit Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team, and is an advisory committee member for the Georgia Violent Death Reporting System. She regularly provides training and technical assistance on issues related to family violence and stalking victimization, is a Certified Professional Trainer on Stalking Victimization by the Stalking Resource Center, a QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Instructor, and is Co-Chair of Georgia’s STOP VAWA Training Initiatives Implementation Subcommittee. Niki is a Georgia Women’s Policy Institute Fellow (2017).  She graduated from the University of Georgia and is fan of the Boston Red Sox and other lost causes.

Taylor Tabb is the Fatality Review Project Coordinator at the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. For the last thirteen years, she has been instrumental in launching and overseeing the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, Georgia’s only statewide initiative to review domestic violence-related fatalities and near fatalities. In this capacity she trains and provides technical assistance to Fatality Review Teams and works to implement recommendations in order to make statewide changes. Taylor co-authors the Fatality Review Project’s Annual Report. Prior to her work on a statewide level, Taylor advocated for battered women as a community based legal advocate and as a victim witness advocate specializing in outreach to victims where no arrest was made.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

2) Gaming Against Violence 

Although video games are often blamed for a number of societal ills, in this session you will learn that videogames are arguably the most effective pedagogical approach to preventing teen dating violence. The session is from the perspective of a founder of a nonprofit organization who has been working to prevent teen dating violence since 2006, and since 2008 has done so through the use of video games. Session attendees will learn of the evidence-based research which demonstrates the effectiveness of video games for teens, parents, and teachers in preventing teen dating violence. They will also learn what it is about video games that provides a distinct advantage over traditional methods.

Drew Crecente, J.D. is the founder and Executive Director of Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta-based nonprofit charitable organization preventing teen dating violence. He is also a member of the Council of Europe's Game Over Hate initiative and a teen dating violence lead for Emory University's IPRCE Violence Prevention Task Force. Drew speaks about teen dating violence and the power of video games for positive social change at conferences and seminars in the U.S. and Europe. Through Jennifer Ann’s Group, Drew created the “Gaming Against Violence” program, an initiative which produces, publishes, and researches video games designed to prevent teen dating violence. Since 2008, Gaming Against Violence has produced over thirty video games which have been developed – and played – by people from around the world. The games have been developed with indie designers in Argentina, Belgium, Canada, England, India, Ireland, Mexico, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Research on this approach to teen dating violence prevention shows that games increase awareness, increase educational information, and changes attitudes about the acceptability of unhealthy relationship Beliefs. Drew has a BBA in Management and Computer Information Systems from the University of Texas, El Paso and a JD in Law from Georgia State University. He utilizes this background in management, technology, and law to seek and apply innovative approaches to violence prevention. Drew lives with his dog in Atlanta, Georgia.

Boreum Hong, J.D. is the Assistant Director of Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta-based nonprofit organization producing and publishing video games which prevent teen dating violence through its Gaming Against Violence program. Boreum is also the founder of the Mural Cats Project, a public awareness campaign about feral cats. Boreum received her B.A. in English Literature from the University of Georgia and her J.D. from J.D. Suffolk University School of Law.

Intended Audience:  Multidisciplinary

3) 21st Century Prosecution: Problems and Pathways 

This workshop will discuss the issues surrounding prosecution of family violence cases and consider alternative solutions to traditional prosecution methods, including; where's the video?, will a jury convict without video evidence?, is the defense interfering with your unwilling victim?, material witness warrants or contempt citations?, creative evidence, and jail calls OK or NoK.

Rosanna Szabo has been a Georgia prosecutor for 30 years. She began in the Ocmulgee Circuit as an Assistant District Attorney in 1987 then moved to the Solicitor's Office in 1989 as the first VAWA funded Domestic Violence Prosecutor in Gwinnett County. She was elected Solicitor-General in 2006. She has tried hundreds of criminal jury trials and has nearly 100 published appeals to her credit. She is married and has two adult children.

Joelle Nazaire is the Chief Assistant Solicitor of Gwinnett County where she supervises six trial teams in State Court. She was an Assistant District Attorney representing the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for five years and has been prosecuting misdemeanors in Gwinnett County for ten years. She has tried hundreds of criminal cases including numerous appeals and oral arguments before the appellate courts. She is married and has two wonderful children.

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Law Enforcement (DCS Officers, Police Officers, Probation Officers), Prosecutors, Legal Advocates, Judges, Victim Advocates, Attorneys

4) Connecting Intimate Partner Violence with Other Social Justice Movements: Working Toward Peace and Safety for All 

The people we serve live complex lives. While our primary goal may be creating safety for someone being abused or holding someone accountable for being abusive, they may struggle to fully utilize our programs or reach their goals due other factors in their lives. These factors, such as poverty, homelessness, healthcare issues, and discrimination, are intertwined in our work with families experiencing violence. This workshop will explore the opportunities that could emerge by connecting the movement to end violence against women to other social change movements. Through large and small group discussion, we'll explore challenges we face creating cross-movement collaborations and provide strategies for forming meaningful connection and partnerships with groups who share common values and goals with the domestic violence movement.

Lee Giordano is a community organizer and violence prevention advocate interested in building and sustaining communities of men dedicated to using anti-oppression frameworks to end male violence against women. As the Director of Training at Men Stopping Violence, Lee designs, organizes, and conducts trainings, workshops, and webinars on oppression and violence against women. Lee co-developed the curriculum, programs, and trainings currently being produced by Men Stopping Violence including Because We Have Daughters and the Mercury Online Multi-Media Training. He also co-authored MSV’s Men at Work curriculum and the Men at Work training that coincides with that curriculum. Most recently, Lee facilitated the development of MSV’s new Mobilizing Men to Prevent Violence Against Women training. A graduate of Georgia State University with a B.S. in Sociology and a minor in Women’s Studies, Lee received his Master’s degree in Social Justice Education from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Christy Showalter is currently the Associate Director for the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence (GCADV) and previously directed GCADV’s training and membership programs. She has worked as an advocate and educator in the fields of domestic violence and sexual assault since 1996. Before coming to GCADV, Christy worked as Director of Education & Services for the Gwinnett Sexual Assault Center & Children’s Advocacy Center and as an outreach advocate and educator with a domestic violence center in Evansville, Indiana. She has provided specialized training and technical assistance around domestic violence intervention and advocacy best practices to a wide range of professionals including advocates, directors, judges, law enforcement, and health professionals, particularly with a focus on trauma informed practices, technology safety and stalking, women’s health and IPV and board best practices. Christy has a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Southern Indiana.  

Intended Audience: Domestic Violence Advocates, Sexual Assault Advocates, Legal Advocates, FVIP Providers, Victim Advocates

5) The Power of a Multi-Disciplinary Team: A Collaborative Approach to Caring for Families Impacted by Child Abuse and Domestic Violence

Over the last few decades, legislation, research and best practices have influenced the use of a multiagency approach to community care. This approach has guided the way in which cases of child abuse and domestic violence are addressed. The purpose of this training is to provide a comprehensive overview of how multidisciplinary teams operate and to highlight the strategies that can be employed through partnership and sharing of information.

Alicia Chandler is a graduate of the University of Georgia with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice. She has also earned her Master’s of Public Administration with a concentration in Criminal Justice from Columbus State University. Alicia has dedicated her career to the victims of sexual assault and abuse; first as a Police Detective specializing in crimes against women and children, and now as a Forensic Interview Specialist. Alicia conducts training on these subjects to law enforcement, community groups, and those in the child advocate field all over the State of Georgia. Alicia began conducting Forensic Interviews in 2007 in and has completed over 1,000 interviews of children. Alicia also facilitates MDT and peer review for her area and is passionate about providing support to the children and families impacted by sexual abuse and domestic violence, using a team approach.

Michelle Dickens is Executive Director of the Athens-Clarke County Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners Program, which provides forensic medical examinations to survivors in Athens-Clarke and seven other surrounding counties. Prior to working for ACC-SANE, she worked for over a decade as a Victim Advocate in the Western Judicial Circuit District Attorney's Office; assigned mostly to crimes against women and children. She serves as a member of Western and Piedmont Circuit Multidisciplinary and Sexual Assault Response Teams. She is currently the Co-Chair of the Western Circuit Domestic Violence Taskforce.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Workshop Session E, 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

1) Using the Danger Assessment and the DA-I (for immigrant women) in Practice 

This breakout will give participants an overview of how the Danger Assessment (DA) and the Danger Assessment-I (for immigrant women) was developed and how to use it in practice. In addition, the short form of the DA (DA-5) for healthcare and the MyPlan app and their use will be described, as well as how survivors talk about their experiences with the DA and what kinds of safety strategies might be recommended at each level of the DA.   

Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell is the Anna D. Wolf Chair and a Professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the National Program Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program.  Her 14 major federally funded collaborative research investigations from the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control have included studies of domestic violence homicide and improving the criminal justice and health care response to intimate partner violence (IPV).  This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near lethal domestic violence and coordinated system (criminal justice, social services and health) responses to address IPV. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine (part of the National Academies of Sciences) in 2000, she was the Co-Chair of the NAM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence and is on the Board of Directors of Futures Without Violence and the One Love Foundation, has served on the boards of five Domestic Violence shelters and is currently a member of the Baltimore DV Fatality Review Committee.  Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles and seven books and has extensive policy related service including testimony at congressional meetings and before the Senate, as well as policy and research agenda setting meetings with NIH, CDC, SAMHSA, DHHS Office on Women’s Health, the Department of Justice (Office on Violence Against Women, NIJ), the World Bank, WHO, and the American Academy of Nursing.    

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

2) Introduction to Working with Men as Parents: Fathers' Parenting Choices Matter

To effectively work with families, we cannot just work with women and children; we must also work with men. Working with men requires being able to understand male parental development and how men’s choices and behaviors impact child and family functioning; it involves understanding how to use this information to engage men and to develop meaningful child and family focused interventions. It also involves being able to integrate these understandings into our work with women and children. While this is important for all families, it is increasingly important for families from poor and historically oppressed communities. To do this correctly, we must approach fathers in a manner that is domestic violence-informed, meaning we must approach men with both high expectations and the willingness to learn new approaches and practices. In this workshop, we will consider all these items from the perspective of domestic violence-informed policy and practice, diverse communities and different disciplines. Throughout this workshop, we will highlight specific connections to the Safe and Together Model principles.

Kyle Pinto, MSW, is an Associate Director at the Safe & Together Institute (formerly David Mandel & Associates). He has provided training and consultation to child welfare systems, domestic violence advocates, fatherhood programs and family courts across the county and internationally. Kyle has worked throughout the child welfare, criminal justice and domestic violence fields for over ten years as a child welfare social worker in the District of Columbia and Providence, RI and as a community educator/counselor for the Women’s Center of Greater Danbury in Connecticut. He has also worked with men on parole and probation through the Alternative to Incarceration Center and has contributed to policy reform with the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance. Kyle was also the founder of The Men’s Initiative, an educational and community activist program highlighting the role men play in violence prevention, which he had the honor of presenting to the International White Ribbon Campaign.

Intended Audience: DFCS Personnel, FVIPs, Judges

3) Task Force Tool Kit: Strategies for Implementation 

This workshop will provide an overview and discussion on the Georgia Commission on Family Violence's Family Violence Task Force Tool Kit, a guide and resource for Family Violence Task Forces around the state. Released in May 2017, the Tool Kit is an update to the "Organizing and Maintaining a Coordinated Community Response to Domestic Violence in your Community" resource, which was created for Georgia Family Violence Task Forces in the early 2000's and is affectionately referred to as the "Purple Book."  Participants will also learn about coordinated community response (CCR) implementation strategies, as well as best practices for developing and sustaining a CCR.

Jenny Aszman, LMSW, is the Program Manager for the Georgia Commission on Family Violence, where she supports the success of a number of family violence initiatives. Jenny previously coordinated the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, conducting reviews with Fatality Review Teams across the state, co-authoring the Project’s annual report and providing technical assistance to Family Violence Task Forces as they implemented recommendations from the Project. She has provided training for the National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA), the National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative, the Battered Women’s Justice Project, the Georgia Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, and the Georgia Head Start Association. Jenny earned her Master’s of Social Work specializing in Community Partnerships from Georgia State University and dual Bachelor’s degrees in Social Work and Women’s Studies from the University of Georgia. Jenny is a QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Instructor, a Georgia Women’s Policy Institute fellowship alum, and a recipient of an Inspiration Award given by Canyon Ranch and Health Magazine.

Stacey Seldon serves as the Statewide Family Violence Coordinator at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. In her position, Stacey supports the development and expansion of coordinated community response (CCR) teams around the state, known as Family Violence Task Forces. Her responsibilities include working with new and existing task forces on organizing and development, training, and strategic planning. Stacey previously spent six years at the Judicial Council/Administrative Office of the Courts, working with court teams around the state to develop and secure funding for domestic violence courts. In 2016, Stacey coordinated a joint project with the Georgia Commission on Family Violence and the Judicial Council/Administrative Office of the Courts, resulting in the development of Georgia’s Domestic Violence Courts Best Practices, an online resource that highlights domestic violence best practices for courts in Georgia based on local and national research.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

4) Changing the Game: Real Wraparound Legal Services Addressing Safety, Health, and Financial Security

This workshop will address how we can “change the game” for survivors by introducing wraparound legal services to our legal advocacy work, which address survivors’ safety, health, and financial security. One way we can begin doing this is by asking survivors what they need instead of telling survivors what we can do for them. We can “change the game” by exploring with survivors the full extent of services and resources available to them. This workshop will address the ways that we can strengthen a survivor’s safety net to  include legal safety protections (protective orders, custody, visitation, child support, housing, and transportation), as well as financial security (child support, SNAP, Crime Victims Compensation, unemployment, TANF, and military benefits), access to health care (Medicaid, Peachcare, ACA, Insurance, and sexual assault services), and criminal process support (victim assistance, prosecutors, law enforcement). Further, if the survivor is an immigrant, a safety net may include a T Visa, U Visa, or VAWA Petition. We can also “change the game” by ensuring that we are all working on the same page to keep survivors safe and hold batterers accountable. Strategies to accomplish those aspects of our work will also be explored.

Vicky Kimbrell is the Health and Family Law attorney with Georgia Legal Services, leading the program's Health and Family Law practice groups. She has litigated federal and state trial and appellate cases dealing with Medicaid, public benefits, custody, child support, and juvenile law, and has been published widely on these topics. She has been quoted in, and written for,national and international media on family violence, and has trained judges, lawyers, and community advocates throughout the state and nationally. Ms. Kimbrell has received several awards for her years of service, including the Georgia Asian and Pacific American Bar Association’s Community Service Award, the Director’s Award from the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council for her work on behalf of victims of crime, as well as the Dan Bradley award from the State Bar of Georgia for her years of service to low-income Georgians. She was recognized by Emory Law School’s Public Interest Committee and received the Gender Justice Award from the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. Ms. Kimbrell was appointed by the Chief Justice to serve on the Georgia Supreme Court’s Committee on Justice for Children and by several Georgia Governors to serve on the Commission on Family Violence. Ms. Kimbrell was recently appointed by the President of the American Bar Association to serve on the ABA’s Committee on Domestic and Sexual Violence. Ms. Kimbrell is a graduate of the University of Georgia School of Law.   

Adrianne Freeman graduated from the University of Georgia in 2003, then crossed the river to attend the University of South Carolina School of Law, where she graduated in 2006. Adrianne has been with Georgia Legal Services since August 2006. She started in the Columbus GLSP office, representing victims of domestic violence in the Southwestern Judicial Circuit. In January 2012, she transferred to the Athens office, where she has practiced ever since. Adrianne was promoted to Senior Staff Attorney in 2015. Adrianne handles a wide variety of cases, but she has a personal and professional interest in representing clients with disabilities. When she is not celebrating victories on behalf of clients, you can find her hunting Pokemon with her two kids, dangling precariously from a trapeze bar, or enjoying a cup of chai with a good book.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

5) Finding Trace: Fusing the Forensic Interview with Forensic Evidence 

This workshop will give advanced knowledge to the audience about the forensic evidence that can be gathered from a crime scene. Specifically, crime scenes involving child abuse, domestic violence and sexual assault. Workshop participants will be given a detailed explanation on what types of corroborating physical and trace evidence can be found by crime scene specialists and the equipment utilized to find even the slightest of trace evidence. This will further participants’ knowledge about corroborating physical and trace evidence, and assist in crafting the investigation in order to strengthen the case so that it does not rely solely on the victim’s testimony.

Jeremy C. Howell holds a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science with a concentration in Civil Rights and Leadership from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. He is currently a Special Agent and Crime Scene Specialist with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. During his seventeen year law enforcement career, he has also served as a police officer with the University of Georgia Police Department, a deputy sheriff with the Madison County Sheriff’s Office, a police officer, investigator, and Chief with the Hoschton Police Department, and as an investigator with the Special Victim’s Unit (SVU) of the Western Judicial Circuit District Attorney’s Office in Athens, Georgia. It is this well-rounded career experience that has provided him with a unique perspective regarding child abuse investigations and interagency partnerships. Jeremy is a Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Certified Instructor and has received advanced training in homicide, sexual assault, and child abuse investigations, as well as crime scene processing, bloodstain pattern analysis, and shooting incident reconstruction. He is also a graduate of the ten week course at the National Forensic Academy, more commonly known as “the body farm,” in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Workshop Session F 8:30 am - 10:00 am

1) Stalking: The Forgotten Lethality Indicator 

This multimedia workshop will review Georgia’s stalking statute, the components of stalking in intimate partner violence cases, and how stalking is often overlooked as a lethality indicator. Using case studies and local statistics, participants in this advanced workshop will examine the real life impact of stalking on Georgia’s communities. Finally, the workshop will take an in-depth look at the latest technologies used to stalk and illustrate best practices for responding to reports of stalking.

Kylee Elliott is the Legal Advocacy Program Manager at liveSAFE Resources in Marietta, Georgia. As a Legal Advocate she supports the domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault victims of Cobb County in a variety of legal venues, from guiding them through the Temporary Protective Order process to supporting them through difficult divorce, legitimation and the criminal victim/witness process. During her tenure with the Cobb County Temporary Protection Order office it has become recognized by many in the legal community at one of the busiest and most progressive TPO advocacy departments in the State of Georgia. As a Sexual Assault Advocate she provides victims of Cobb, Cherokee and Paulding Counties with support during the physical examination as well as on-site crisis counseling following the sexual assault medical examination. Further, Kylee speaks frequently in the community to provide victim centered training to attorneys, law enforcement, the military and the general public. She frequently offers training and technical assistance on issues related to family violence and stalking victimization to advocates across the state, and is a Certified Professional Trainer on Stalking Victimization by the National Stalking Resource Center. She has been qualified as an expert witness in the area of family violence and is an active member of the Cobb County Domestic Violence Task Force and its Fatality Review Committee. Kylee received Bachelor’s degrees in Criminal Justice and English from the University of Georgia and ,prior to becoming a victim advocate, she worked in the legal field as a paralegal and had an extensive career in the nonprofit field as a fundraising, development and operations director.  

Niki Lemeshka is the Fatality Review Coordinator at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. In that capacity she oversees the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, conducts reviews of domestic violence-related fatalities and near fatalities with multi-disciplinary teams across the State of Georgia, co-authors the Project’s Annual Report and provides technical assistance to task forces as they implement Project recommendations. Previously, she filled the roles of Outreach Coordinator and Legal Advocate at Cherokee Family Violence Center (Canton, GA) and was employed in Child Protective Services. Niki previously served on the State of Georgia’s Protocol Development Committee for co-occurring cases of domestic violence and child maltreatment, is the former Chair of both the Cherokee County Domestic Violence Task Force and the Blue Ridge Judicial Circuit Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team, and is an advisory committee member for the Georgia Violent Death Reporting System. She regularly provides training and technical assistance on issues related to family violence and stalking victimization, is a Certified Professional Trainer on Stalking Victimization by the Stalking Resource Center, a QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Instructor, and is Co-Chair of Georgia’s STOP VAWA Training Initiatives Implementation Subcommittee. Niki is a Georgia Women’s Policy Institute Fellow (2017).  She graduated from the University of Georgia and is fan of the Boston Red Sox and other lost causes.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

2) Experiences and Behaviors of the Traumatized Brain 

This presentation is appropriate for all helping professions, with a heavy emphasis on the physiological effects of trauma. The audience will develop a clearer understanding of how traumatic experiences change the brain and body. After attending the presentation, audience members will be able to: 1) Identify simple versus complex trauma, 2) Understand a few key areas of the brain that play a part in encoding and retrieving trauma based memories, 3) Explain behaviors commonly observed in survivors of trauma, and 4) Learn how to incorporate trauma sensitive language and techniques.

Anjana Freeman has a Master of Science in Clinical and Counseling Psychology and is a Licensed Professional Counselor. Her areas of focus are the physiology/psychology of trauma, pathological sexual development and sexual violence, dynamics of abuse and aggression, reactive and attachment problems in children and adolescents. Anjana exclusively treated violent and sexual offenders for seven years before shifting her focus to survivors of abuse. Now, she is the in-house therapist at Rape Response in Gainesville providing Cognitive Processing Therapy and other therapeutic and crisis interventions to survivors. Anjana has taught psychology courses at the university level since 2009 and currently supervises Master’s level Clinical Counseling students. She provides education to medical personnel, law enforcement, investigators and legal professionals about the science of trauma. Anjana provides expert testimony in the areas of trauma effects on memory and cognition, tonic immobility during a traumatic event, and commonly observed behaviors of survivors of complex trauma.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

3) Domestic Violence Accountability Court Findings and Best Practices 

This workshop will focus on ten domestic violence court best practices as outlined in the Judicial Council/Administrative Office of the Courts’ and Georgia Commission on Family Violence's resource, Georgia Domestic Violence Courts Best Practices, an online resource that highlights domestic violence best practices for courts in Georgia based on local and national research. The presentation will provide an overview of the components of a domestic violence court, as well as provide insight and resources on how to start a domestic violence court.

Stacey Seldon serves as the Statewide Family Violence Coordinator at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. In her position, Stacey supports the development and expansion of coordinated community response (CCR) teams around the state, known as Family Violence Task Forces.  Her responsibilities include working with new and existing task forces on organizing and development, training, and strategic planning. Stacey previously spent 6 years at the Judicial Council – Administrative Office of the Courts, working with court teams around the state to develop and secure funding for domestic violence courts.  In 2016, Stacey coordinated a joint project with the Georgia Commission on Family Violence and the Judicial Council/Administrative Office of the Courts, resulting in the development of Georgia’s Domestic Violence Courts Best Practices.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

4) Branding and Marketing Your Organization

Branding and marketing strategies, tactics and plans are becoming more important for nonprofits in outreach, messaging and communications, and fundraising. Learn successful strategies and tactics, how to build a brand and provide communication that supports your organizational goals and fundraising plans. Learn best practices for social media, branding, marketing and communications.

Kathy Keeley is the Executive Vice President of Programs for the Georgia Center for Nonprofits. Her expertise includes strategic planning and solution-building, project design, performance assessment and management, board and staff retreats, social enterprise, finance and economic development, and executive coaching. With experience as a social entrepreneur, a consultant, the Chief of Staff for the Mayor of Minneapolis, founder of multiple organizations, and the director of nonprofit and for-profit businesses, Keeley has worked with organizations of all kinds in more than 25 states and 30 countries. Over her 35+ year career as a consultant, she has turned around struggling and underperforming ventures, helped launch new companies and initiatives, and given established successes new pathways toward efficiency and expansion.

Intended Audience:  Multidisciplinary

5) Georgia Office of Victim Services: Who We Are and What We Do

In 2005, Pardons and Paroles (PAP) and Georgia Department of Correction (GDC) combined their offices of victim services to form the Corrections and Parole Board Office of Victim Services. On July 1, 2015, with the creation of the Department of Community Supervision (DCS), the office began serving victims for all three agencies and is now the Georgia Office of Victim Services (OVS). The office provides post-sentencing support and information to crime victims, their families, and members of the community. This workshop will provide an overview of the services and programs offered to crime victims during the post-conviction phase of the criminal justice process and attendees will be able to discuss the statutory requirements as it relates to GDC, PAP, and DCS. During the workshop, presenters will explain the registration process for access to the Victim Information Program (V.I.P); discuss the different types of notifications for the parole consideration process (PAP); discuss how Georgia OVS serves as a liaison between crime victims and GDC (unwanted contact) and DCS (restitution); and provide an overview of Victims Visitors’ Day, Victim Offender Dialogue, and Victim Support Partners.

Keir Chapple
is the Deputy Director of the Georgia Office of Victim Services. Keir earned a BS degree in Electrical Engineering Technology from Georgia Southern University in 2000 and his MBA from Keller Graduate School of Management in 2004. He began his career with the State Board of Pardons and Paroles as a Parole Officer in the Fulton County area in 2005. He was designated as the electronic monitoring (EM) specialist and supervised all EM and sex offender cases in the district. Keir volunteered to become the district arrest team coordinator and was placed on the Metro Regional Arrest Team in 2006. He was promoted to Assistant Chief Parole Officer in October of 2007. Keir developed a desire to work with crime victims after volunteering at a Victims Visitors’ Day event during National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. He transferred to the Office of Victim Services as a Program Manager in 2014. He was responsible for managing the state’s Victim Offender Dialogue Program, unwanted inmate contacts and restitution services. He was promoted to Deputy Director in July 2015. He is a POST certified Instructor and a certified Crisis Intervention Team Officer and Trainer. Keir has successfully completed the National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) Victim Assistance Academy. He is also a member of the National Association of Victim Assistance in Corrections (NAVAC), National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA), the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) and the Georgia Professional Association of Community Supervision (GPACS). Keir currently lives in the Atlanta area with his wife of sixteen years and his two sons.

Destiny Brown is the Program Manager for the Georgia Office of Victim Services (OVS). She manages the Georgia OVS Notifications team. The Notifications team is responsible for Registrations, Notifications, Restitution and Unwanted Offender Contacts. Destiny began her career with the Georgia Office of Victim Services in 2008 as a Victim Services Specialist. She was promoted to a Probation Officer for the Atlanta Judicial Circuit and assigned to the Atlanta Community Impact Program (ACIP) Unit in 2012. After 18 months in the field as a Certified Georgia Peace Officer, she was assigned to the Georgia OVS as a Victim Services Specialist and later promoted to Program Manager. In 2007, Destiny earned her Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice with a minor in Psychology from Clark Atlanta University. She received a certificate in Basic Management Training in 2015 from the Georgia Department of Corrections. She is an active member of the Georgia Professional Association of Community Supervision (GPACS). Destiny is a native of Oakland, California and currently resides in Stockbridge, Georgia.


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Workshop Session G 10:15 am - 11:45 am

1) Removing the Barrier of Silence for Deaf Survivors of Domestic Violence

Silence within abusive relationships has a unique impact on survivors who are Deaf or hard of hearing (HOH). This interactive workshop, facilitated in both English and American Sign Language (ASL), will increase understanding of ways to improve and increase services for Deaf/HOH survivors of domestic violence. Information on Deaf culture and intersecting identities within the Deaf community will be provided before delving into the dynamics of power and control and the specific needs of Deaf/HOH survivors. By the end of this workshop, the participants will have a better understanding of the unique barriers the Deaf community has. Workshop participants will also revisit the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and discuss both legal requirements and ethical best practice, receive available resources for Deaf/HOH survivors, and learn ways to strengthen partnerships and collaborate with agencies that serve the Deaf community.  

Letitia Lowe has 17 years of experience working in the domestic violence field. For a total of 5 years, Letitia has worked with the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence and is currently the Disabilities Project Manager. As a part of the Disabilities Project, Letitia is partnering with the Georgia Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (GCDHH) and the University of Georgia to provide technical assistance, support, consultation, training, and evaluation to five Georgia domestic violence programs that are designated pilot sites. The goal of the Disabilities Project is to improve domestic violence services for Georgia’s Deaf survivors in domestic violence shelter programs. Letitia has experience managing a former Disabilities Project with GCADV in 2012, where gaps and barriers to service for Deaf survivors in domestic violence programs were identified. During this project, GCADV partnered with GCDHH and Tools for Life. Prior to working at GCADV, Letitia worked at Refuge House, Inc., a domestic violence program in Tallahassee, Florida as an advocate and case manager and has worked at the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV) as a Domestic Violence and Disabilities Training Specialist. Letitia earned a Bachelor’s degree from Florida A&M University in Social Work and a Master’s of Social Work degree from Florida State University.

DeAnna Swope is Deaf and works at Avita Community Partners as a contractor case manager and employee of Georgia Center of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (GCDHH) for the direct service mental health ASL program. The program focuses on improving quality of life by providing support, comprehensive services, and planning to assist Deaf and Hard of Hearing clients in crisis. She was born in Eatonton, Georgia and graduated from Clarkston High School before obtaining a  B.A. in Social Service and Criminal Justice and M.A. in Public Administration from Ashford University.  

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary


2) Psychological Perspectives on the Dynamics of Abuse 

This presentation will focus on the experiences and behaviors of the traumatized psyche. The workshop will address how bonding develops through the ongoing cycle of abuse as intermittent reinforcement of reward and punishment, often creating a powerful emotional bond that is resistant to change. Additional experiences and behaviors that will be explored include enmeshment, codependency, learned helplessness, attachment disorders, and personality disorders. The goal of this session is to help intervention professionals better understand and communicate with victims who are struggling against these powerful forces.

Anjana Freeman has a Master of Science in Clinical and Counseling Psychology and is a Licensed Professional Counselor. Her areas of focus are the physiology/psychology of trauma, pathological sexual development and sexual violence, dynamics of abuse and aggression, reactive and attachment problems in children and adolescents. Anjana exclusively treated violent and sexual offenders for 7 years before shifting her focus to survivors of abuse. Now, she is the in-house therapist at Rape Response in Gainesville providing Cognitive Processing Therapy and other therapeutic and crisis interventions to survivors. Anjana has taught psychology courses at the university level since 2009 and currently supervises Master’s level Clinical Counseling students. She provides education to medical personnel, law enforcement, investigators and legal professionals about the science of trauma. Anjana provides expert testimony in the following areas:
trauma effects on memory and cognition, tonic Immobility during a traumatic event, and commonly observed behaviors of survivors of complex trauma. 

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

3) FVIP Facilitators and Community Associates/Advocates, "Can We Talk" 

In our effort to be the best facilitators, community associates, and advocates, it is imperative that we are good listeners in our communication skills. How are we present with participants in our programs, the individuals we serve? Are we creating a space where they feel they can be open to sharing their reality in a way that will enable accountability, growth, learning, safety, and vulnerability? Creating this space is directly connected to how we communicate with the participants (people) we serve. This workshop will increase your skills to effectively communicate in a way that values the others’ experience without colluding or justifying their responsibility to create a safe environment.

Sulaiman Nuriddin has worked over thirty years in the field of violence intervention with Men Stopping Violence. During that time he served as the Director of Men's Education, has conducted trainings and workshops, given keynote addresses, served on panels, spoken in forums and speak outs, and served as a consultant with organizations. Sulaiman is trained as a therapist, counselor, educator, and has a private practice, where he teaches and educates couples and individuals, to be the best they can be in their relationships. He also co-facilitates support groups for men. Creating a safe place for men to openly share their experiences (challenges, issues, concerns,fears) in being the best fathers, husbands, and partners, they can be. Sulaiman is also educated and trained in the field of Imago Therapy.

Myra Nuriddin has over forty years of service in the airline industry, as a stewardess, flight attendant, and administrator. This experience has enhanced her ability to be present with people from various cultural, ethnic backgrounds, and lifestyles. During this time, Myra has worked in private practice with Sulaiman to enhance the relationships of couples. In addition to having sessions with couples, Myra has also co-facilitated workshops for couples focused on deepening and improving their relationship and connectivity. Myra is also a trained educator in Imago Therapy.

Intended Audience: FVIPs

4) Abuse in Later Life 

This workshop will cover domestic violence, sexual assault, and financial abuse in later life. The workshop will review case studies and knowledge gained since implementing an elder abuse victim services program in Cobb County. The presenters will provide resources and strategies for working with older victims of abuse as these cases present unique challenges.

Elisa Covarrubias is the Director of Sexual Assault and Advocacy Programs at liveSAFE Resources. In her current role, she is responsible for the management of the Sexual Assault, Legal Advocacy, Latino Outreach, Elder Abuse and Victim Services Liaison programs. She has worked with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault for 12 years and previously worked with consumers of mental health services. Elisa is involved in various local task forces and multidisciplinary teams that address victim safety and offender accountability, as well as other committees which strive to improve access to quality victim services across the State of Georgia.

Jason Marbutt is a Senior Assistant District Attorney with the Cobb Judicial Circuit in Marietta, specializing in white collar crime, public integrity, and elder abuse. He has been a prosecutor for 12 years, handling thousands of cases in all areas of criminal conduct. He is one of the few Georgia prosecutors with trial experience involving the Georgia RICO Statute. He is also one of a handful of prosecutors in the State of Georgia who specializes in the prosecution of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. All cases that involve a victim age 65 years of age or older in the Cobb Judicial Circuit come across his desk. Mr. Marbutt is the Chair of the North Georgia/Cobb Elder Abuse Task Force, an organization based in Cobb County which works to promote collaboration, training, and education related to elder abuse throughout North Georgia. He has also been recognized for his work prosecuting at-risk adult crimes by both the Georgia House and Georgia Senate, each passing resolutions to take note of his work in the Spring of 2017. He has a law degree from Emory School of Law, where he is an Adjunct Professor, teaching a class on sentencing. He has a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. His wife is also attorney; they have 3 children.

Intended Audience: Multidisciplinary

5) Branding and Marketing Your Organization

Branding and marketing strategies, tactics and plans are becoming more important for nonprofits in outreach, messaging and communications, and fundraising. Learn successful strategies and tactics, how to build a brand and provide communication that supports your organizational goals and fundraising plans. Learn best practices for social media, branding, marketing and communications.

Kathy Keeley is the Executive Vice President of Programs for the Georgia Center for Nonprofits. Her expertise includes strategic planning and solution-building, project design, performance assessment and management, board and staff retreats, social enterprise, finance and economic development, and executive coaching. With experience as a social entrepreneur, a consultant, the Chief of Staff for the Mayor of Minneapolis, founder of multiple organizations, and the director of nonprofit and for-profit businesses, Keeley has worked with organizations of all kinds in more than 25 states and 30 countries. Over her 35+ year career as a consultant, she has turned around struggling and underperforming ventures, helped launch new companies and initiatives, and given established successes new pathways toward efficiency and expansion.

Intended Audience:  Multidisciplinary